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Questions about the 3.8% Tax on Housing? Answers & Resources Here:

3.8% Tax on Housing? Answers & Resources:

I have had clients and friends ask me about what might happen after the election with this, “real estate tax thing,” or the administration’s health care program. Some of the rumors revolving around tax got out of hand a while back and were very scary for homebuyers and even sellers. If you still have questions on this Real Estate Tax, please check out this post with some of the facts that will hopefully put your mind a bit more at ease.

The KCM crew is credible source and always up to date on ALL things real estate related – good and bad. Check out this article as well as a  few other resources, that have been provided in this post, and please don’t fret until you have the facts.

by The KCM Crew on September 25, 2012 ·

The KCM crew has previously reported on the questions surrounding the existence of a 3.8% tax in the administration’s health care program. Today we want to update the post in order to help further explain the issue. – The KCM Crew

Here are the 10 Things You Need to Know About the 3.8% Tax according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR):

1.) When you add up all of your income from every possible source, and that total is less than $200,000 ($250,000 on a joint tax return), you will NOT be subject to this tax.

2.) The 3.8% tax will NEVER be collected as a transfer tax on real estate of any type, so you’ll NEVER pay this tax at the time that you purchase a home or other investment property.

3.) You’ll NEVER pay this tax at settlement when you sell your home or investment property. Any capital gain you realize at settlement is just one component of that year’s gross income.

4.) If you sell your principal residence, you will still receive the full benefit of the $250,000 (single tax return)/$500,000 (married filing joint tax return) exclusion on the sale of that home. If your capital gain is greater than these amounts, then you will include any gain above these amounts as income on your Form 1040 tax return. Even then, if your total income (including this taxable portion of gain on your residence) is less than the $200,000/$250,000 amounts, you will NOT pay this tax. If your total income is more than these amounts, a formula will protect some portion of your investment.

5.) The tax applies to other types of investment income, not just real estate. If your income is more than the $200,000/$250,000 amount, then the tax formula will be applied to capital gains, interest income, dividend income and net rents (i.e., rents after expenses).

6.) The tax goes into effect in 2013. If you have investment income in 2013, you won’t pay the 3.8% tax until you file your 2013 Form 1040 tax return in 2014. The 3.8% tax for any later year will be paid in the following calendar year when the tax returns are filed.

7.) In any particular year, if you have NO income from capital gains, rents, interest or dividends, you’ll NEVER pay this tax, even if you have millions of dollars of other types of income.

8.) The formula that determines the amount of 3.8% tax due will ALWAYS protect $200,000 ($250,000 on a joint return) of your income from any burden of the 3.8% tax. For example, if you are single and have a total of $201,000 income, the 3.8% tax would NEVER be imposed on more than $1000.

9.) It’s true that investment income from rents on an investment property could be subject to the 3.8% tax. BUT: The only rental income that would be included in your gross income and therefore possibly subject to the tax is net rental income: gross rents minus expenses like depreciation, interest, property tax, maintenance and utilities.

10.) The tax was enacted along with the health care legislation in 2010. It was added to the package just hours before the final vote and without review. NAR strongly opposed the tax at the time, and remains hopeful that it will not go into effect. The tax will no doubt be debated during the upcoming tax reform debates in 2013.

Additional Resources

Our Original KCM Blog Post

NAR’s Official Handout

The Impact of the 3.8% Tax on Rents

 

Please feel free to comment on this post with any further questions or information about this matter.

And, if you are looking for other questions with regards to your real estate needs, please feel free to get in touch with me at bbesserer@briggsfreeman.com

or my Mother/partner, Lisa Besserer at Lbesserer@briggsfreeman.com

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